Australia fertility rate and trends pdf
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TRENDS IN AGE- AND PARITY-SPECIFIC FERTILITY IN AUSTRALIA

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Australia’s fertility rate trends and issues FaCS SHEET. WHY IS AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION AGEING? Trends in the numbers of older people (say those aged 65 years and over) in any area are a function of the following demographic processes. a Zshock wave of rapidly increasing numbers in Fertility – the rate at which women in that area were having children 65-90 years ago. Mortality – the rate at which older people are lost to death. Migration, TRENDS IN FERTILITY IN THE UNITED STATES Selma Taffel, Division of Vital Statistics INTRODUCTION The fertility of American women has dropped to unprecedentedly low levels in recent years. Since 1957, there has been an almost continuous decline in the rate at which women have been bearing children. The rate of decrease accelerated sharply from 1970 to 1973, and the level of fertility ….

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TRENDS IN AGE- AND PARITY-SPECIFIC FERTILITY IN AUSTRALIA. Fertility decline in Australia Fertility levels and trends Australia has experienced almost uninterrupted fer-tility decline since 1961. This decline has occurred in three main phases (Figure 1). The first phase from 1961 to the mid-1970s was a period of sharp and dramatic decline when the fertility rate dropped from 3.55 in 1961 to 2.15 in 1975 – a decline of 1.4 children per woman in, Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments..

pdf (1.8mb) Highlights of General Household Survey 2015 Presents the key findings from the General Household Survey 2015 on marriage and fertility, education, language, religion, households and housing, married couples and transport characteristic. In 2010, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.89 babies per woman, a small decrease from 1.90 babies per woman in 2009. Fertility rates decreased slightly …

2008, Australia’s fertility rate temporarily recovered to 2.02 babies per female, the highest recorded in the 40 years to 2016 (Figure 1). Despite temporary up-swings in fertility in recent years, Australia’s TFR has been below the replacement level of 2.1 babies for the last 40 years and was stable at 1.79 in 2016. Recent trends Queensland’s broad fertility movements align with national vi FPNSW : Reproductive and sexual health in New South Wales and Australia: differentials, trends and assessment of data sources Table 2.1: Age-specifi c fertility rates, Australian states and territories, 2008 20

Figure 3: Australia’s annual population growth rate from 1972 to 2014 Data Sources: 3105.0.65.001 Australian Historical Population Statistics, 2014 and 3101.0 for 2012, 2013 & 2014 Although at high levels now, the population growth rate was even higher in the 1950s and 1960s. Fertility rates have been generally rising for the last six years, and evidence suggests that after its long downward trend since the Second World War, Australia’s fertility rate may have stabilised at around 1.75 to 1.9 babies per woman.

Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the Based on recent trends, the TFR is projected to fall to 1.6 by 2042.2 While this is lower than Australia’s TFR of 1.75 in 2000, it is higher than the fertility rates in many OECD countries, including Italy, Japan and Sweden. Australia’s current TFR is higher than the OECD average, but significantly lower than New Zealand (at 2.01 in 2000) and the United States (at 2.13 in 2000). Today’s

2008, Australia’s fertility rate temporarily recovered to 2.02 babies per female, the highest recorded in the 40 years to 2016 (Figure 1). Despite temporary up-swings in fertility in recent years, Australia’s TFR has been below the replacement level of 2.1 babies for the last 40 years and was stable at 1.79 in 2016. Recent trends Queensland’s broad fertility movements align with national Sexual Health information networking & education SA SEXUAL HEALTH STATISTICS (updated Sept 2014) Teenage pregnancy • South Australia (and Australia) has one of the highest teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in developed countries. Although unacceptably high, the teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have been declining in SA over the last decade. • In SA in 2011 the teenage pregnancy rate

The general fertility rate is the least refined measure of fertility in a given population, used when the specific ages of mothers are not known. The numerator is the number of live births in a year and the denominator is the number of females of child bearing age. The definition of childbearing age varies between jurisdictions. In Australia it is defined as 15-49 years. + Data Table TRENDS IN FERTILITY IN THE UNITED STATES Selma Taffel, Division of Vital Statistics INTRODUCTION The fertility of American women has dropped to unprecedentedly low levels in recent years. Since 1957, there has been an almost continuous decline in the rate at which women have been bearing children. The rate of decrease accelerated sharply from 1970 to 1973, and the level of fertility …

The total fertility rate (TFR) represents the number of children a female would bear during her lifetime if she experienced current age-specific fertility rates at each age of her reproductive life. In 1961, at the height of the postwar baby boom, Australia’s total fertility rate (TFR) stood at 3.56, more than twice the 1999 level of 1.75. Most of the decline in fertility

HealthStats NSW Total fertility rate NSW. Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the, pattern and recent trend of fertility rates are examined. Three sources of data have been examined: (a) Births Australia statistics produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)a for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008; (b).

Fertility Testing Devices Market Growth Trends and

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Statistics Singapore Births and Fertility - Visualising Data. Australia’s fertility rate: trends and issues Ageing of the population In recent years, the ageing of the population has been of increasing concern to government, WHY IS AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION AGEING? Trends in the numbers of older people (say those aged 65 years and over) in any area are a function of the following demographic processes. a Zshock wave of rapidly increasing numbers in Fertility – the rate at which women in that area were having children 65-90 years ago. Mortality – the rate at which older people are lost to death. Migration.

www.budget.gov.au

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Recent Trends in Australian Fertility Productivity. • In 2015, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.81 babies per woman. • Since 1976, the TFR for Australia has been below replacement level. This means the • In 2015, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.81 babies per woman. • Since 1976, the TFR for Australia has been below replacement level. This means the.

australia fertility rate and trends pdf


ACT and Region Demographics and Trends While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this document, the uncertain nature of economic data, forecasting and analysis means that Access Economics Pty Limited is unable to make any warranties in FERTILITY IN NEW SOUTH WALES The total fertility rate (TFR) of New South Wales in 1999 was 1.81, higher than the TFR at the Australian level (1.75). Both these TFRs were well below replacement level fertility (currently a TFR of 2.06), which is the number of children a women would need to have during her lifetime to replace both herself and her partner. Compared with other countries, the TFR

In 2009, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.90 babies per woman, a small decrease from 1.96 babies per woman in 2008. Fertility rates decreased slightly … Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments.

Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the In 1961, at the height of the postwar baby boom, Australia’s total fertility rate (TFR) stood at 3.56, more than twice the 1999 level of 1.75. Most of the decline in fertility

In this section we report the recent and future trends in mortality, fertility and net immigration rates and document the past and projected future size and age distribution of Australia’s population. Based on recent trends, the TFR is projected to fall to 1.6 by 2042.2 While this is lower than Australia’s TFR of 1.75 in 2000, it is higher than the fertility rates in many OECD countries, including Italy, Japan and Sweden. Australia’s current TFR is higher than the OECD average, but significantly lower than New Zealand (at 2.01 in 2000) and the United States (at 2.13 in 2000). Today’s

Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments. Trends in fertility and birth rates The fertility rate measures the number of births per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15 to 44) occurring in a particular year; birth rates refer to this measure within particular age groups.

Labour participation rates are expected tofall from around 65 to 60per cent from 2012 to 2060, and overall labour supply per capita to contract by 5 per cent. Average labour productivity growth is projected to be around 1.5 per cent per annum Fertility rates have been generally rising for the last six years, and evidence suggests that after its long downward trend since the Second World War, Australia’s fertility rate may have stabilised at around 1.75 to 1.9 babies per woman.

Fertility has been in decline globally for many decades. In the five years to 2005, the world average total fertility rate (TFR) was projected to be 2.7 babies per woman, a Declining fertility rates. First, there has been a major change in Australia’s fertility rate. Since the 1960s, there has been a steady decline in fertility rate, resulting in a slow population growth in the younger age groups.13 Fertility rates have fallen below the replacement level of 2.1 children per woman for the past 25 years, a pattern

In 2009, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.90 babies per woman, a small decrease from 1.96 babies per woman in 2008. Fertility rates decreased slightly … WHY IS AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION AGEING? Trends in the numbers of older people (say those aged 65 years and over) in any area are a function of the following demographic processes. a Zshock wave of rapidly increasing numbers in Fertility – the rate at which women in that area were having children 65-90 years ago. Mortality – the rate at which older people are lost to death. Migration

In 1961, at the height of the postwar baby boom, Australia’s total fertility rate (TFR) stood at 3.56, more than twice the 1999 level of 1.75. Most of the decline in fertility • Australia’s annual population growth rate since 1960 has averaged 1.6 per cent. • Population growth results from natural increase (an excess of births over deaths) and net overseas migration (the difference between immigration and emigration).

Australia New South Wales fertility rate 2017 I Statistic

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Number 9 Australia's fertility rate trends and issues. "In 2011, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.88 babies per woman, down very slightly from the 2010 TFR of 1.89 babies per woman. Since 1976, the total fertility rate for Australia has been below replacement level. That is, the average number of babies born to a woman throughout her reproductive life (measured by the TFR) has been insufficient to replace herself and her partner. The, vi FPNSW : Reproductive and sexual health in New South Wales and Australia: differentials, trends and assessment of data sources Table 2.1: Age-specifi c fertility rates, Australian states and territories, 2008 20.

HealthStats NSW Population by Local Government Area by age

Recent trends in Australian fertility CORE. Overall fertility rates in Australia are continuing to decline, and current cultural trends are likely to keep the fertility rate down well into the future, according to Monash University demographer and sociologist Dr Genevieve Heard., total fertility rate (births per woman) and interstate and overseas migration. This provides three alternative forecasts of the future size and structure of the Australian population whereby, for example, Series I utilises high level assumptions regarding fertility rates and overseas and internal migration (e.g., high fertility rates and large net interstate and overseas migration) to project.

The total fertility rate is the conventional ‘headline’ measure of a country’s fertility. In the long term, the total fertility rate is affected by attitudes and values and changes in the socioeconomic characteristics of the population. In the short term, it can be affected by macro-economic trends, but when fertility is low (as in Australia) those effects are likely to be small. The ACT and Region Demographics and Trends While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this document, the uncertain nature of economic data, forecasting and analysis means that Access Economics Pty Limited is unable to make any warranties in

Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the • Australia’s annual population growth rate since 1960 has averaged 1.6 per cent. • Population growth results from natural increase (an excess of births over deaths) and net overseas migration (the difference between immigration and emigration).

The total fertility rate (TFR) represents the number of children a female would bear during her lifetime if she experienced current age-specific fertility rates at each age of her reproductive life. Fertility services market estimated to reach at $30,964 million by 2023.Surge in prevalence of delayed pregnancies and growth in infertility rates drive the fertility services industry. Competitive analysis and profiles of key market players, such as Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd, Care Fertility Group, Carolinas Fertility Institute.

This statistic displays the total fertility rate in New South Wales from 2009-2010 to 2016-2017. According to the source, on average about 1.67 children were born per woman in New South Wales in Fertility decline in Australia Fertility levels and trends Australia has experienced almost uninterrupted fer-tility decline since 1961. This decline has occurred in three main phases (Figure 1). The first phase from 1961 to the mid-1970s was a period of sharp and dramatic decline when the fertility rate dropped from 3.55 in 1961 to 2.15 in 1975 – a decline of 1.4 children per woman in

Fertility rates have been generally rising for the last six years, and evidence suggests that after its long downward trend since the Second World War, Australia’s fertility rate may have stabilised at around 1.75 to 1.9 babies per woman. Using published data from the Australian vital registration and census systems, several time series are compiled: crude birth rates from the 1860s; fertility rates from the 1880s; age-specific and parity-specific measures from the 191Os; cumulative fertility measures by birth year of parent

Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments. TRENDS IN FERTILITY IN THE UNITED STATES Selma Taffel, Division of Vital Statistics INTRODUCTION The fertility of American women has dropped to unprecedentedly low levels in recent years. Since 1957, there has been an almost continuous decline in the rate at which women have been bearing children. The rate of decrease accelerated sharply from 1970 to 1973, and the level of fertility …

Using published data from the Australian vital registration and census systems, several time series are compiled: crude birth rates from the 1860s; fertility rates from the 1880s; age-specific and parity-specific measures from the 191Os; cumulative fertility measures by birth year of parent 2008, Australia’s fertility rate temporarily recovered to 2.02 babies per female, the highest recorded in the 40 years to 2016 (Figure 1). Despite temporary up-swings in fertility in recent years, Australia’s TFR has been below the replacement level of 2.1 babies for the last 40 years and was stable at 1.79 in 2016. Recent trends Queensland’s broad fertility movements align with national

Australia’s fertility rate: trends and issues Ageing of the population In recent years, the ageing of the population has been of increasing concern to government In 2010, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.89 babies per woman, a small decrease from 1.90 babies per woman in 2009. Fertility rates decreased slightly …

Rebecca Kippen 2 Fertility in Australia—an overview Period fertility In 1961, at the height of the postwar baby boom, Australia’s total fertility rate (TFR) stood at Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments.

In 2010, Australia's total fertility rate (TFR) was 1.89 babies per woman, a small decrease from 1.90 babies per woman in 2009. Fertility rates decreased slightly … Figure 1 Ð Australia: T otal fertility rate**, 1901-2005 Source: C B CS Demography 1 and A B S B irths Australia ,2 various issues R ecent trends in Australian fertility By Professor Graeme Hugo Director N a tio na l C entre fo r So cia l A pplications of G eographical Information Systems The U niversity of Adelaide South Australia Few processes will play a greater role in Australia Õs

It provides most recent and trend data for 70 different indicators in comparing Australia with 19 other developed countries. Areas examined include population, fertility and pregnancy, important causes of ill-health, mortality, health services and resources, and health determinants. The data contained in the report is supported by graphs and league tables that show Australia's position amongst pattern and recent trend of fertility rates are examined. Three sources of data have been examined: (a) Births Australia statistics produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)a for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008; (b)

FERTILITY IN NEW SOUTH WALES The total fertility rate (TFR) of New South Wales in 1999 was 1.81, higher than the TFR at the Australian level (1.75). Both these TFRs were well below replacement level fertility (currently a TFR of 2.06), which is the number of children a women would need to have during her lifetime to replace both herself and her partner. Compared with other countries, the TFR Overall fertility rates in Australia are continuing to decline, and current cultural trends are likely to keep the fertility rate down well into the future, according to Monash University demographer and sociologist Dr Genevieve Heard.

Fertility rates have been generally rising for the last six years, and evidence suggests that after its long downward trend since the Second World War, Australia’s fertility rate may have stabilised at around 1.75 to 1.9 babies per woman. pattern and recent trend of fertility rates are examined. Three sources of data have been examined: (a) Births Australia statistics produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)a for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008; (b)

total fertility rate (births per woman) and interstate and overseas migration. This provides three alternative forecasts of the future size and structure of the Australian population whereby, for example, Series I utilises high level assumptions regarding fertility rates and overseas and internal migration (e.g., high fertility rates and large net interstate and overseas migration) to project In China the low fertility rate is a more serious problem than the aging population, According to the National Bureau of Statistics, 17.23 million newborns were added to China's population last year, down 630,000 year-on-year, and the birth rate dropped from 1.295 per cent in 2016 to 1.243 per cent in 2017. The decreasing trend of fertility rates and increasing lifestyle disorders among women

Fertility A baby bounce for Australia?

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Australia’s fertility rate trends and issues FaCS SHEET. Australia’s fertility rate: trends and issues Ageing of the population In recent years, the ageing of the population has been of increasing concern to government, Fertility rate. The ‘fertility rate’ refers to the average number of children that are born to a woman who is a member of a particular demographic population, during her reproductive years (internationally these are nominated as the ages between 15 and 44)..

www.budget.gov.au. In China the low fertility rate is a more serious problem than the aging population, According to the National Bureau of Statistics, 17.23 million newborns were added to China's population last year, down 630,000 year-on-year, and the birth rate dropped from 1.295 per cent in 2016 to 1.243 per cent in 2017. The decreasing trend of fertility rates and increasing lifestyle disorders among women, Trends in fertility and birth rates The fertility rate measures the number of births per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15 to 44) occurring in a particular year; birth rates refer to this measure within particular age groups..

Fertility A baby bounce for Australia?

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

Trends in age- and parity-specific fertility in Australia. Figure 1 Ð Australia: T otal fertility rate**, 1901-2005 Source: C B CS Demography 1 and A B S B irths Australia ,2 various issues R ecent trends in Australian fertility By Professor Graeme Hugo Director N a tio na l C entre fo r So cia l A pplications of G eographical Information Systems The U niversity of Adelaide South Australia Few processes will play a greater role in Australia Õs Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the.

australia fertility rate and trends pdf

  • Population Dynamics in Regional Australia
  • Reproductive and Sexual Health in New South Wales and
  • 3301.0 Births Australia (2010) Australian Bureau of

  • Fertility rates have been generally rising for the last six years, and evidence suggests that after its long downward trend since the Second World War, Australia’s fertility rate may have stabilised at around 1.75 to 1.9 babies per woman. vi FPNSW : Reproductive and sexual health in New South Wales and Australia: differentials, trends and assessment of data sources Table 2.1: Age-specifi c fertility rates, Australian states and territories, 2008 20

    Sexual Health information networking & education SA SEXUAL HEALTH STATISTICS (updated Sept 2014) Teenage pregnancy • South Australia (and Australia) has one of the highest teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in developed countries. Although unacceptably high, the teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have been declining in SA over the last decade. • In SA in 2011 the teenage pregnancy rate The Research FaCS Sheet series was produced by the former Department of Family and Community Services (the former FaCS). The aim of the series was to provide a brief overview of varied social policy research undertaken by FaCS staff or research undertaken in conjunction with external research bodies.

    • The fertility rate has reached 1.7 babies per woman for Australia as a whole, 1.6 in Adelaide, Perth and Canberra and 1.5 in Melbourne. 3 • The fertility rate fell from about 6 babies per woman in the mid-nineteenth century 4 to Fertility rates have fallen steeply from a peak of 3.5 babies per woman in 1961 to 1.8 in 2016 -- below the level needed to replenish the population. It's been below this level since 1976.

    total fertility rate (births per woman) and interstate and overseas migration. This provides three alternative forecasts of the future size and structure of the Australian population whereby, for example, Series I utilises high level assumptions regarding fertility rates and overseas and internal migration (e.g., high fertility rates and large net interstate and overseas migration) to project This is because the Australian fertility rate has risen and is close to the replacement rate and because the level of international migration has increased substantially. It is important that these favourable demographic trends continue. As shown in the analysis above, by 2030, Australia will be the youngest among the English-speaking countries and the countries of Western Europe. It will also

    Fertility services market estimated to reach at $30,964 million by 2023.Surge in prevalence of delayed pregnancies and growth in infertility rates drive the fertility services industry. Competitive analysis and profiles of key market players, such as Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd, Care Fertility Group, Carolinas Fertility Institute. Australia’s fertility rate has been below replacement level since the 1970s. Women are having fewer than two babies over their life course. Sub-replacement fertility is important for governments.

    AUSTRALIA’s fertility rate is expected to remain steady at 1.9 births per woman over the next 40 years, a rate that has hardly budged since the late 1970s. The government’s 2015 • The fertility rate has reached 1.7 babies per woman for Australia as a whole, 1.6 in Adelaide, Perth and Canberra and 1.5 in Melbourne. 3 • The fertility rate fell from about 6 babies per woman in the mid-nineteenth century 4 to

    Figure 1 Ð Australia: T otal fertility rate**, 1901-2005 Source: C B CS Demography 1 and A B S B irths Australia ,2 various issues R ecent trends in Australian fertility By Professor Graeme Hugo Director N a tio na l C entre fo r So cia l A pplications of G eographical Information Systems The U niversity of Adelaide South Australia Few processes will play a greater role in Australia Õs The fertility rate is the average number of children born by one woman while being of child-bearing age. In 2011, Australia's fertility rate amounted to 1.93 children per woman.

    Fertility and Birth Rates March 2015 3 Trends Fertility rates in the United States declined sharply between the baby boom years of the 1950s Sexual Health information networking & education SA SEXUAL HEALTH STATISTICS (updated Sept 2014) Teenage pregnancy • South Australia (and Australia) has one of the highest teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in developed countries. Although unacceptably high, the teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have been declining in SA over the last decade. • In SA in 2011 the teenage pregnancy rate

    Births in Australia are at an historical high - with around 285 000 babies born in 2007. This corresponds to an estimated total fertility rate of 1.93 babies per woman, the highest since the early 1980s. WHY IS AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION AGEING? Trends in the numbers of older people (say those aged 65 years and over) in any area are a function of the following demographic processes. a Zshock wave of rapidly increasing numbers in Fertility – the rate at which women in that area were having children 65-90 years ago. Mortality – the rate at which older people are lost to death. Migration

    Total fertility rate: 1.9 Full-time 8.1 mil Part-time 3.6 mil Unemployed 0.8 mil Households 9.1 mil Average household size 2.6 people/household Median age 37.3 Births 300,900 Deaths 148,600 Natural increase 152,300 Arrivals 492,400 Departures 279,900 Net overseas migration 212,500 EMPLOYMENT POPULATION HOUSEHOLDS Total employed 11.7 mil Unemployment rate 6.2% Total population … Demographic influences on long-term economic growth in Australia Australia's strong economic performance in recent years has reflected several key

    Sexual Health information networking & education SA SEXUAL HEALTH STATISTICS (updated Sept 2014) Teenage pregnancy • South Australia (and Australia) has one of the highest teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in developed countries. Although unacceptably high, the teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have been declining in SA over the last decade. • In SA in 2011 the teenage pregnancy rate In 1961, at the height of the postwar baby boom, Australia’s total fertility rate (TFR) stood at 3.56, more than twice the 1999 level of 1.75. Most of the decline in fertility

    the total fertility rate (TFR) having fallen to below replacement fertility level1 from 1976. However, from 1998 onwards fertility has stabilised, with a TFR of about 1.75 children per woman. The combined trends of low and declining fertility and mortality are increasing population ageing leading to public concerns and debate about the impact of the demographic changes on the society, economy Fertility rates have fallen steeply from a peak of 3.5 babies per woman in 1961 to 1.8 in 2016 -- below the level needed to replenish the population. It's been below this level since 1976.

    FERTILITY IN NEW SOUTH WALES The total fertility rate (TFR) of New South Wales in 1999 was 1.81, higher than the TFR at the Australian level (1.75). Both these TFRs were well below replacement level fertility (currently a TFR of 2.06), which is the number of children a women would need to have during her lifetime to replace both herself and her partner. Compared with other countries, the TFR Sexual Health information networking & education SA SEXUAL HEALTH STATISTICS (updated Sept 2014) Teenage pregnancy • South Australia (and Australia) has one of the highest teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in developed countries. Although unacceptably high, the teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have been declining in SA over the last decade. • In SA in 2011 the teenage pregnancy rate

    Figure 1 Ð Australia: T otal fertility rate**, 1901-2005 Source: C B CS Demography 1 and A B S B irths Australia ,2 various issues R ecent trends in Australian fertility By Professor Graeme Hugo Director N a tio na l C entre fo r So cia l A pplications of G eographical Information Systems The U niversity of Adelaide South Australia Few processes will play a greater role in Australia Õs Population Dynamics in Regional Australia, January 2015 Page 2 The Regional Australia Institute Independent and informed by both research and ongoing dialogue with the community, the

    Australia's population has quadrupled in the past century, with the number of people tipped to reach 25 million this year. If current trends continue the population could top 40 million within 40 In this section we report the recent and future trends in mortality, fertility and net immigration rates and document the past and projected future size and age distribution of Australia’s population.

    Overall fertility rates in Australia are continuing to decline, and current cultural trends are likely to keep the fertility rate down well into the future, according to Monash University demographer and sociologist Dr Genevieve Heard. It provides most recent and trend data for 70 different indicators in comparing Australia with 19 other developed countries. Areas examined include population, fertility and pregnancy, important causes of ill-health, mortality, health services and resources, and health determinants. The data contained in the report is supported by graphs and league tables that show Australia's position amongst

    Demographic influences on long-term economic growth in Australia Australia's strong economic performance in recent years has reflected several key It provides most recent and trend data for 70 different indicators in comparing Australia with 19 other developed countries. Areas examined include population, fertility and pregnancy, important causes of ill-health, mortality, health services and resources, and health determinants. The data contained in the report is supported by graphs and league tables that show Australia's position amongst

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